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ynthrepic

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ynthrepic , (edited )
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Is the royal family not the richest in the UK? Edit: Not just me wondering this I see!

ynthrepic , (edited )
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Yeah... There's a bigger question too that is, why can't other foods containing Vitamin A be supplied to the starving people of the Philippines? There are so many sources.

Let's consider how fucked it is that even considering introducing this crop to the wild is necessary.

I've previously supported golden rice, but you've changed my mind. We should just be doing more to support developing nations directly. The world has sufficient abundance we shouldn't need to take these dangerous shortcuts. Not yet.

Try me when we're closer to Mad Max earth.

ynthrepic ,
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This.

ynthrepic ,
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I don't like Greenpeace, but these are good arguments.

ynthrepic ,
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That's exactly what I'm saying we should do. Brown rice ironically while it is food, might be like giving a baby an economic pacifier instead of trade milk and expecting it to grow. The Philippines has a range of biodiverse crops and other commodities that have more value than just the one food to feed them all, which would undercut the market and stifle local knowledge over time.

That said someone here suggested a more advanced plan to seed the beta-carotine gene into the native species, which is awesome in theory, but could create patent law violations and just generally be incredibly risky to the very biodiversity we're trying to protect.

This is why I think while the science is very cool, we should avoid such irreversible treatments unless it's a last resort.

Mosquitos on the other hand. Love the idea of genetically editing those fuckers out of existence. As the world inevitably warms, malaria is only going to spread further and wider. We should be getting ahead of that catastrophic future while we have the chance.

ynthrepic ,
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Sure, but that doesn't really address the argument in making. It's a lazy way out that benefits the western world for its low cost and the fact is carrying a patented gene modification. We should be doing more, not relying on risky shortcuts.

Maybe one day all rice cultivars will be golden and the world we'll be better off for it. But if the history of other GM crops is anything to go by, it sucks for the environment, and low prices screw local farmers over.

ynthrepic ,
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What about when rice prices crash and local small scale farmers go out of business?

ynthrepic , (edited )
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I don't follow. What goal posts have I shifted? I don't deny that rice is easy. My point is that it's a shortcut that could have other negative consequences that more funding could avoid.

ynthrepic , (edited )
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Direct would be doing the farming for them, or handing over food directly. Or sending in workers to train local farmers to grid Vitamin A rich crops.

Rice is a shortcut, and sure it might "work", but there are other potential long-term externalities at play here, that golden rice alone is insufficient to account for. It would be a plaster covering a surface wound when there is internal bleeding to worry about.

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